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Summer Gardening

Summer Gardening

If you know me, or recently read my 15 Things About Me post, you’ll know that I love to dig in the dirt. I like green things and happily live my life with a small amount of dirt under my fingernails.   I plant a garden […]

15 Things About Me

15 Things About Me

Here’s a fun little Instagram tag I completed recently. 15 random things you may not know about me. 1. I am a California girl born and raised. 2. I will be getting married this September to my fiance, whom I have been with for 9 […]

Ironman Santa Rosa 70.3 2017 Race Report – Finish & Afterthoughts

Ironman Santa Rosa 70.3 2017 Race Report – Finish & Afterthoughts

Finish and Afterthoughts

I came up on the chute, adjusted my kit, picked up the pace and prettied my form (My finish pics were gonna look nice okay). I booked it though the chute and finished with a time of 7:33:43. Final run time of 2:49:00, 25 minutes faster than my split in Arizona.

When I started the run, I thought I might be able to get closer to 7 hrs, but after my GI issues, I was happy to finish clean, or as clean as one can be after 70.3 miles, and on two feet. I ended the race feeling pretty good. I’m not saying I wanted to go out right that second and double the distance, but if someone had told me I needed to turn around and do more, I definitely could have done so.

In the end, I raced a bit under my goal HR, about 3bpm under on the bike and 5 on the run. The bike was lower mainly because I was being conservative. I hadn’t exactly done much hill training prior to this and I was unsure how much the climbing would take out of me. My run hr was lower solely due to GI issues, something I hope to have figured out before my full. And my swim, while I was disappointed about my panic attack, I’m fairly certain it was a fluke, so I won’t dwell on it. I still beat my previous swim time. In fact, I beat all three of my previous splits.

I’d say my hydration was on point, in fact, I learned how to fill up my aero bottle on the course. Before this race I hadn’t realized there was a quick way to fill the bottle, DUH.  I still l need to work on my nutrition. It was not terrible, I definitely got more calories in here than I did at Arizona. I could have taken more in on the bike and probably should have taken in some chews on the run.

The course for this race is beautiful. If you are thinking about registering, do it. Wine country in California is beautiful year round and the climate is mild. If you are thinking about doing the full in July, it will be hotter, but not terribly so. I believe the bike course will be the same with loops, although we only have to do the big climb once (yay!) and the run course should also be very similar, just a little elongated. All in all, a great race, in a gorgeous venue.

Ironman Santa Rosa 70.3 2017 Race Report – Run

Ironman Santa Rosa 70.3 2017 Race Report – Run

T2 and The Run I click clacked my way down my row in T2 to rack my bike. T2 was full, but not quite as full as last year. I was happy I wouldn’t be out alone on my run again. Transition was uneventful. I […]

Ironman Santa Rosa 70.3 2017 Race Report – Bike

Ironman Santa Rosa 70.3 2017 Race Report – Bike

The Bike I headed to the mount line, my cleats making that familiar click clack noise as I hobbled along. Rounding the corner out of T1, I saw the mount line. There was a huge jumble of athletes, at least 20 at the base of […]

Ironman Santa Rosa 70.3 2017 Race Report – Swim

Ironman Santa Rosa 70.3 2017 Race Report – Swim

Race Start – The Swim and T1

My teammate and I headed down the hill to the water’s edge. Our feet hurt with each step. In the athlete guide, it was stated that the run from the swim exit to T1 would be carpeted, well that didn’t happen. They carpeted the boat ramp, which happened to be cement and doesn’t really hurt too much to walk on, but left the asphalt that had a ton of gravel on it uncarpeted. This was VERY painful to walk on. Tiny gentle steps had to be taken. I immediately regretted leaving my beloved Croc flip flops in my morning bag. Many athletes were smarter than I and had lined theirs up along the side of the road. I wished I had. If you are going to do the full or this half next year, for the love of your poor feet, bring flip flops!

We grimaced our way down to the start and seeded ourselves in our respective times. This swim was a rolling start, meaning athletes needed to seed themselves based on their prospective times. I chose 40 minutes. I thought I might be a bit faster than that, but 40 seemed a safe number. I didn’t know how the cold water would affect me. I found another teammate starting in the same timing section as myself, so we waited together.

The pros were already out in the water and headed back in. I saw the men come running up the ramp and off to T1. In a few minutes the cannon went off. My second 70.3 had started! It took about 15 minutes to get to the water, before we started. I stepped in and it wasn’t too bad. The race director had said the water temp was 64 degrees, which isn’t terrible. I’m not used to swimming in the cold, but it wasn’t bad on my feet. A few more steps and I was swimming, my body felt warm, that Roka suit is awesome and then I plunged my head into the water, heading out.

This is where things got bad. I was not used to submerging my face in that cold of water, especially when it was barely 50 degrees outside. My face was cold, it was a shock to my body and I struggled to breathe. I forged ahead thinking it’d subside in a few minutes, but it didn’t. It got worse. All of the anxiety I had dealt with over the past few hours, the no sleep, the crazy motel neighbors, general pre-race jitters, had left my nerves frayed. I had nothing left to fight off this swim issue. I flipped on my back and gasped for air, supremely irritated at myself for letting this happen.

I’m not a super fast swimmer, but I am a strong swimmer. I can swim for a very long time and don’t tire easily. I’ve never been afraid to go out in the water, especially a lake! I had been excited for the swim portion of this race. It’s the only discipline, I’m halfway decent at. I was making gains in the pool and my new Roka suit gave me a 10 second advantage over my pool times. I was excited to see what kind of time I would get.

Well, I continued to struggle and finally allowed myself to hold onto a SUP board for what felt  like forever, even though it was probably less than a minute. The volunteer asked if I was okay, and I said I just needed to catch my breath. I was so mad at myself, but I pushed it aside gathered myself back up, slowed my breathing and moved on. I continued to struggle but was able to make forward progress and keep my head, mostly in the water. I swam freestyle with a bit of breaststroke moving buoy to buoy for the first 500 yards.

Finally at the first turn, I had calmed enough to get into sort of a rhythm. I normally breathe every forth stroke. I know I should breathe bilaterally and I can, but 4 is just more efficient for me. Well I was breathing every 2 strokes, I couldn’t get it down. Finally about halfway through I got myself to do a 4, 2, 2 sight rhythm. Speaking of sighting, I was constantly away from the crowd of swimmers, out to the right. I struggled to get in line and swim with everyone else, because I kept or at least I thought I kept veering off course. I’ve since taken a look at my Garmin Data and I actually only swam about 95 extra yards (So not bad for me!) and my swim lines weren’t too jagged, so maybe I wasn’t as off course as I thought I was.

I truly didn’t warm up and begin to pick speed back up until over halfway through the swim. Finally I was comfortable and in a rhythm. I rounded another red buoy and headed back in, 800 yards to go. The swim was smooth from here on, aside from dealing with the sun in my eyes. I wore slightly tinted goggles, but wished I had brought my mirrored ones. Definitely bring mirrored goggles if you plan on doing this race.

I closed in on the ramp and was finally able to stand up. I quickly moved out of the water and headed up the ramp to T1. Last year I was very jumbled and disoriented coming out of the water, this year I felt totally fine. Well as fine as you can feel, coming out of a cold 1.2 mile swim. I think the new wetsuit made a huge difference. My official swim time was 43:20 at a 1:58 pace, 4 minutes faster than my previous HIM swim.

Up the ramp I headed to T1. The carpet ended and I was on the asphalt. Every step was painful and I was trying to be careful. I didn’t want to cut my foot or give myself a huge blister before my ride or half marathon. I finally figured out that walking on the white lines gave some relief. They were smooth and had very few rocks on them. I got to the top of the hill and wanted to scream! The asphalt run continued for at least another couple hundred yards winding all of the way around transition, way past my lane. It took FOREVER for me to get to my bike, but finally I made it, cut/blister free to boot!

I wrangled myself out of my wetsuit and jammed my arms into my fleece arm warmers. It was 50 degrees and I was so worried I’d get cold on the bike. The first 4 miles is all downhill. I was wearing a tank tri top, but added my aero top over it for extra warmth. I almost shoved plastic bags down my shirt to block the wind, worrying I’d get too cold, but changed my mind at the last minute. T1 took me 15 minutes! I took probably 5 minutes or less at my bike, but the “run” up to T1 was truly something awful. If you do this race in the future or the full in July bring Flip Flops, get a pair you don’t care about. You WILL regret it if you don’t.

After changing, I sucked down an applesauce pouch, tossed all of my extra gear into my bike bag, grabbed my bike and headed to the mount line, ready to begin the bike portion.

To Read About the Bike Click Here

Ironman Santa Rosa 70.3 2017 Race Report

Ironman Santa Rosa 70.3 2017 Race Report

Pre-Race Check-in on Friday went smoothly, I got my packet picked up, my bike racked, my bags checked and best of all I got to meet some of my Coeur Sports Teammates! I could not be happier with the team I’ve been blessed with this […]

Sock Bouquet DIY

Sock Bouquet DIY

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. Actually it’s tomorrow. Here is a simple DIY for my fellow procrastinators. Roses are great to get on Valentine’s Day, but they die. I much prefer flowers that last, usually buying potted plants as gifts. For the runner […]

DIY Finisher’s Jacket and Patches

DIY Finisher’s Jacket and Patches

I am a fairly frugal person. I’ll spend money on quality items, but I have to see the value in the item. At the expo for my 70.3 this October, I had a chance to check out all of the Ironman Finisher’s gear. It all looked great, but the price tags on most of the stuff was a bit hard to swallow. Going in, I had planned on trying to get a finisher’s jacket. The patch jacket caught my eye. I wanted a jacket, that I could add my next race to, but at 153.00 for a glorified Costco jacket I couldn’t pull the trigger. What can I say? I’m just too cheap, besides mama want’s a new bike and I like the idea of being able to put non-branded race patches on the jacket. So, I made my own.

I’ve done cross-stitching before, but never embroidery. How hard could it be? Well turns out, not too hard, but definitely time consuming. I made a finisher’s jacket for myself and my fiance. The lettering is very easy to do, detailed designs like my Arizona 70.3 patch are a bit more complicated.

70473375100457704-account_id1Materials

  • Embroidery Floss in your desired colors.
  • Embroidery needles
  • An embroidery hoop
  • Patch fabric – I chose a muslin with looser weave
  • Water soluble pen or a pencil
  • Mod Podge
  • Fray Check
  • Fabric Glue or Heat ‘n Bond.

 

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All of my patches were traced from simple patterns. I got the font for my FINISHER lettering from a simple google search and my M-Dot 70.3 logo was also from an image search. I simply printed the logo and lettering at the sizes I wanted, cut them out and traced them with my water soluble pen. *Note: I started out with a pencil, but moved to the pen. The pen is a lot easier to erase if you make any mistakes.

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My patches were all done with two stitch types a backstick for outlining and a satin stitch for filling. This video was quite helpful in getting my technique (such as it is) down: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KkltvMWTdQ&t=726s

For the lettering and M-dot I  did a satin stitch fill first and then backstitched the outline in black to make them pop. The Arizona 70.3 race patch was quite a bit more complicated, although I stuck with the same two stitches.

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For the race patch, I used a sticker that I had purchased at the race expo as my inspiration. I free handed the drawing, as you can see with the wonky lettering, but considering my artistic ability is about a 2 on a scale of 1-10 I consider it a success.

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4305699869036252068-account_id1After finishing all of my patches, I glued the back threads with Mod Podge, cut out the patches, applied fray check to the edges and affixed the patches to my jacket. My first attempt at affixing the patches was with a material called Heat n’ Bond. It’s a double sided iron-on head reactant glue for fabric. This didn’t work so well, probably due to the thickness of my patches. They were lifting at the corners after a day. I ended up using Aleene’s fabric glue and it worked perfectly.

*Design note: I placed the 70.3 and Arizona race patch on the same side, because I want to put a full M-dot logo on the right hand side of the jacket. I didn’t want my M-dots set in different places over the jacket.

Making these patches, while time consuming and far from perfect, was a great way for me to unwind after my race. I had spent months at a go-g0-g0 level and needed some time to recoup and fully process my race. I finished the patches in about a week and a half and I’d say I spent about 20 hours total on the project. I’ll continue making patches after every big race as a way to de-stress and of course to fill out my one of a kind finisher’s jacket. If I ever fill up my jacket I may start putting patches on a tote bag.

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Ambassadorships, what are they, how do you apply and who are they looking for?

Ambassadorships, what are they, how do you apply and who are they looking for?

Let’s talk about the ambassadorships and sponsorships that are available for every day athletes like you and me. For those of you that are unaware or perhaps vaguely aware, the majority of companies are currently taking advantage of our ever-increasing interconnected world and have begun […]